Home

More information and resources from the Highgate HitList
Community support available from The Highgate Society & HNCC

Please also Add your events

Sep
27
Mon
a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX
Sep 27 @ 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm
a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX

LUX is pleased to announce an exhibition of moving image, sound and ephemera by Onyeka Igwe showing at LUX, Waterlow Park from 8th September to 17th October 2021.

Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk-in. Book here

With a forensic lens, Onyeka Igwe’s a so-called archive interrogates the decomposing repositories of Empire. Blending footage shot over 2020 in two separate colonial archive buildings—one in Lagos, Nigeria, and the other in Bristol, United Kingdom—this double portrait considers the ‘sonic shadows’ that colonial images continue to generate, despite the disintegration of their memory and their materials. Igwe’s film imagines what might have been ‘lost’ from these archives. It mixes the genres of the radio play, the corporate video tour, and detective noir, with a haunting and critical approach to the horror of discovery.

a so-called archive depicts the former vaults—along with their histories of hoarding, monetisation, documentation and now abandonment—as metonyms for the enduring entanglements between the UK and its former colonies. These sites were and continue to be home to purulent images that we cannot, will not, or choose not to see. -Mason Leaver-Yap

Igwe’s first solo exhibition at LUX a so-called archive, includes the film of the same name, as well as an outdoor audio piece and ephemeral display in the library expanding on the archives interrogated in the film. A collective reading event will also take place on Saturday 16th October – details to be announced. Audio described and captioned screenings will take place daily.

This exhibition is part of this year’s Curatorial Fellowship programme this broken piece of yard by Cairo Clarke. 


Screening Schedule

The runtime of a so-called archive is 20 minutes. The film will screen three times within a one-hour time slot. The first screening will be followed by audio described and captioned screenings. Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk in. Please check the screening schedule below. (AD: Audio Description, OC: Open Caption) 

12pm | 12.20pm (with AD) | 12.40pm (with OC)

1pm | 1.20pm (with AD) | 1.40pm (with OC)

2pm | 2.20pm (with AD) | 2.40pm (with OC)

3pm | 3.20pm (with AD) | 3.40pm (with OC)

4pm | 4.20pm (with AD) | 4.40pm (with OC)

Luminosa @ Jacksons Lane
Sep 27 @ 7:30 pm – 8:40 pm
‘Luminosa’ by the Lost in Translation circus company
July 3, 2021
Photograph : Luke MacGregor

A brand-new circus cabaret for the 21st century! A sizzling, scintillating night of daring feats, fun and fantastic performance. Expect a night packed with Chinese Pole, silks, straps, aerial hoop, hand balancing, acrobatics, hooping and flying pole, alongside brilliant live music from Peter Reynolds.

Sep
28
Tue
a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX
Sep 28 @ 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm
a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX

LUX is pleased to announce an exhibition of moving image, sound and ephemera by Onyeka Igwe showing at LUX, Waterlow Park from 8th September to 17th October 2021.

Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk-in. Book here

With a forensic lens, Onyeka Igwe’s a so-called archive interrogates the decomposing repositories of Empire. Blending footage shot over 2020 in two separate colonial archive buildings—one in Lagos, Nigeria, and the other in Bristol, United Kingdom—this double portrait considers the ‘sonic shadows’ that colonial images continue to generate, despite the disintegration of their memory and their materials. Igwe’s film imagines what might have been ‘lost’ from these archives. It mixes the genres of the radio play, the corporate video tour, and detective noir, with a haunting and critical approach to the horror of discovery.

a so-called archive depicts the former vaults—along with their histories of hoarding, monetisation, documentation and now abandonment—as metonyms for the enduring entanglements between the UK and its former colonies. These sites were and continue to be home to purulent images that we cannot, will not, or choose not to see. -Mason Leaver-Yap

Igwe’s first solo exhibition at LUX a so-called archive, includes the film of the same name, as well as an outdoor audio piece and ephemeral display in the library expanding on the archives interrogated in the film. A collective reading event will also take place on Saturday 16th October – details to be announced. Audio described and captioned screenings will take place daily.

This exhibition is part of this year’s Curatorial Fellowship programme this broken piece of yard by Cairo Clarke. 


Screening Schedule

The runtime of a so-called archive is 20 minutes. The film will screen three times within a one-hour time slot. The first screening will be followed by audio described and captioned screenings. Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk in. Please check the screening schedule below. (AD: Audio Description, OC: Open Caption) 

12pm | 12.20pm (with AD) | 12.40pm (with OC)

1pm | 1.20pm (with AD) | 1.40pm (with OC)

2pm | 2.20pm (with AD) | 2.40pm (with OC)

3pm | 3.20pm (with AD) | 3.40pm (with OC)

4pm | 4.20pm (with AD) | 4.40pm (with OC)

Luminosa @ Jacksons Lane
Sep 28 @ 7:30 pm – 8:40 pm
‘Luminosa’ by the Lost in Translation circus company
July 3, 2021
Photograph : Luke MacGregor

A brand-new circus cabaret for the 21st century! A sizzling, scintillating night of daring feats, fun and fantastic performance. Expect a night packed with Chinese Pole, silks, straps, aerial hoop, hand balancing, acrobatics, hooping and flying pole, alongside brilliant live music from Peter Reynolds.

Sep
29
Wed
a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX
Sep 29 @ 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm
a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX

LUX is pleased to announce an exhibition of moving image, sound and ephemera by Onyeka Igwe showing at LUX, Waterlow Park from 8th September to 17th October 2021.

Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk-in. Book here

With a forensic lens, Onyeka Igwe’s a so-called archive interrogates the decomposing repositories of Empire. Blending footage shot over 2020 in two separate colonial archive buildings—one in Lagos, Nigeria, and the other in Bristol, United Kingdom—this double portrait considers the ‘sonic shadows’ that colonial images continue to generate, despite the disintegration of their memory and their materials. Igwe’s film imagines what might have been ‘lost’ from these archives. It mixes the genres of the radio play, the corporate video tour, and detective noir, with a haunting and critical approach to the horror of discovery.

a so-called archive depicts the former vaults—along with their histories of hoarding, monetisation, documentation and now abandonment—as metonyms for the enduring entanglements between the UK and its former colonies. These sites were and continue to be home to purulent images that we cannot, will not, or choose not to see. -Mason Leaver-Yap

Igwe’s first solo exhibition at LUX a so-called archive, includes the film of the same name, as well as an outdoor audio piece and ephemeral display in the library expanding on the archives interrogated in the film. A collective reading event will also take place on Saturday 16th October – details to be announced. Audio described and captioned screenings will take place daily.

This exhibition is part of this year’s Curatorial Fellowship programme this broken piece of yard by Cairo Clarke. 


Screening Schedule

The runtime of a so-called archive is 20 minutes. The film will screen three times within a one-hour time slot. The first screening will be followed by audio described and captioned screenings. Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk in. Please check the screening schedule below. (AD: Audio Description, OC: Open Caption) 

12pm | 12.20pm (with AD) | 12.40pm (with OC)

1pm | 1.20pm (with AD) | 1.40pm (with OC)

2pm | 2.20pm (with AD) | 2.40pm (with OC)

3pm | 3.20pm (with AD) | 3.40pm (with OC)

4pm | 4.20pm (with AD) | 4.40pm (with OC)

Luminosa @ Jacksons Lane
Sep 29 @ 7:30 pm – 8:40 pm
‘Luminosa’ by the Lost in Translation circus company
July 3, 2021
Photograph : Luke MacGregor

A brand-new circus cabaret for the 21st century! A sizzling, scintillating night of daring feats, fun and fantastic performance. Expect a night packed with Chinese Pole, silks, straps, aerial hoop, hand balancing, acrobatics, hooping and flying pole, alongside brilliant live music from Peter Reynolds.

Sep
30
Thu
a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX
Sep 30 @ 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm
a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX

LUX is pleased to announce an exhibition of moving image, sound and ephemera by Onyeka Igwe showing at LUX, Waterlow Park from 8th September to 17th October 2021.

Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk-in. Book here

With a forensic lens, Onyeka Igwe’s a so-called archive interrogates the decomposing repositories of Empire. Blending footage shot over 2020 in two separate colonial archive buildings—one in Lagos, Nigeria, and the other in Bristol, United Kingdom—this double portrait considers the ‘sonic shadows’ that colonial images continue to generate, despite the disintegration of their memory and their materials. Igwe’s film imagines what might have been ‘lost’ from these archives. It mixes the genres of the radio play, the corporate video tour, and detective noir, with a haunting and critical approach to the horror of discovery.

a so-called archive depicts the former vaults—along with their histories of hoarding, monetisation, documentation and now abandonment—as metonyms for the enduring entanglements between the UK and its former colonies. These sites were and continue to be home to purulent images that we cannot, will not, or choose not to see. -Mason Leaver-Yap

Igwe’s first solo exhibition at LUX a so-called archive, includes the film of the same name, as well as an outdoor audio piece and ephemeral display in the library expanding on the archives interrogated in the film. A collective reading event will also take place on Saturday 16th October – details to be announced. Audio described and captioned screenings will take place daily.

This exhibition is part of this year’s Curatorial Fellowship programme this broken piece of yard by Cairo Clarke. 


Screening Schedule

The runtime of a so-called archive is 20 minutes. The film will screen three times within a one-hour time slot. The first screening will be followed by audio described and captioned screenings. Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk in. Please check the screening schedule below. (AD: Audio Description, OC: Open Caption) 

12pm | 12.20pm (with AD) | 12.40pm (with OC)

1pm | 1.20pm (with AD) | 1.40pm (with OC)

2pm | 2.20pm (with AD) | 2.40pm (with OC)

3pm | 3.20pm (with AD) | 3.40pm (with OC)

4pm | 4.20pm (with AD) | 4.40pm (with OC)

Oct
1
Fri
a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX
Oct 1 @ 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm
a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX

LUX is pleased to announce an exhibition of moving image, sound and ephemera by Onyeka Igwe showing at LUX, Waterlow Park from 8th September to 17th October 2021.

Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk-in. Book here

With a forensic lens, Onyeka Igwe’s a so-called archive interrogates the decomposing repositories of Empire. Blending footage shot over 2020 in two separate colonial archive buildings—one in Lagos, Nigeria, and the other in Bristol, United Kingdom—this double portrait considers the ‘sonic shadows’ that colonial images continue to generate, despite the disintegration of their memory and their materials. Igwe’s film imagines what might have been ‘lost’ from these archives. It mixes the genres of the radio play, the corporate video tour, and detective noir, with a haunting and critical approach to the horror of discovery.

a so-called archive depicts the former vaults—along with their histories of hoarding, monetisation, documentation and now abandonment—as metonyms for the enduring entanglements between the UK and its former colonies. These sites were and continue to be home to purulent images that we cannot, will not, or choose not to see. -Mason Leaver-Yap

Igwe’s first solo exhibition at LUX a so-called archive, includes the film of the same name, as well as an outdoor audio piece and ephemeral display in the library expanding on the archives interrogated in the film. A collective reading event will also take place on Saturday 16th October – details to be announced. Audio described and captioned screenings will take place daily.

This exhibition is part of this year’s Curatorial Fellowship programme this broken piece of yard by Cairo Clarke. 


Screening Schedule

The runtime of a so-called archive is 20 minutes. The film will screen three times within a one-hour time slot. The first screening will be followed by audio described and captioned screenings. Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk in. Please check the screening schedule below. (AD: Audio Description, OC: Open Caption) 

12pm | 12.20pm (with AD) | 12.40pm (with OC)

1pm | 1.20pm (with AD) | 1.40pm (with OC)

2pm | 2.20pm (with AD) | 2.40pm (with OC)

3pm | 3.20pm (with AD) | 3.40pm (with OC)

4pm | 4.20pm (with AD) | 4.40pm (with OC)

Rachael Weitzman: The Heath in the Waves @ Highgate Gallery
Oct 1 @ 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm

In 2020 and 2021, when waves of pandemic locked down London and elsewhere, the Heath became a place of escape and refuge for many.  Rachael Weitzman’s exhibition of paintings made during this period is a celebration of the Heath and the ancient trees that live there.

Rachael describes these paintings as ‘portraits’ of trees, the paint forming a lattice of trunks and branches, dappled with light or silhouetted against the sky – characterful and strange, rather than pretty or picturesque.  Her inspiration comes from Japanese prints as well as 20thCentury abstraction; she uses different elements to produce a particular style that conveys the solidity, scale and unique ‘personality’ of each tree.

When she first visited the Heath she was amazed at its size, losing her bearings and loving the feeling of being in an endless wilderness.  As she says, “There is something really magical about this area of woodland.  It’s so unusual, even outside London, to find such ancient trees in non-agricultural land.  The people who manage it have done such a fantastic job of maintaining it in an unspoilt way”.

It is now 150 years since an Act of Parliament saved the Heath from development, after a long campaign by activists to save it.  In recognition of the history of the area, its beauty and the way in which it has been of such solace to so many in recent times, ten per cent of sales from this show are being donated to Heath Hands, a charity which organises volunteers to maintain, conserve and educate people about the Heath.

Rachael Weitzman has lived in North London for most of her life.  She went to Chelsea College of Art and Design in 1992 and taught there for a number of years while painting and exhibiting at various galleries and art spaces in London.

For further information please contact rachaelkirkby@yahoo.co.uk

Instagram rachaelweitzman

 

Oct
2
Sat
Rachael Weitzman: The Heath in the Waves @ Highgate Gallery
Oct 2 @ 11:00 am – 4:00 pm

In 2020 and 2021, when waves of pandemic locked down London and elsewhere, the Heath became a place of escape and refuge for many.  Rachael Weitzman’s exhibition of paintings made during this period is a celebration of the Heath and the ancient trees that live there.

Rachael describes these paintings as ‘portraits’ of trees, the paint forming a lattice of trunks and branches, dappled with light or silhouetted against the sky – characterful and strange, rather than pretty or picturesque.  Her inspiration comes from Japanese prints as well as 20thCentury abstraction; she uses different elements to produce a particular style that conveys the solidity, scale and unique ‘personality’ of each tree.

When she first visited the Heath she was amazed at its size, losing her bearings and loving the feeling of being in an endless wilderness.  As she says, “There is something really magical about this area of woodland.  It’s so unusual, even outside London, to find such ancient trees in non-agricultural land.  The people who manage it have done such a fantastic job of maintaining it in an unspoilt way”.

It is now 150 years since an Act of Parliament saved the Heath from development, after a long campaign by activists to save it.  In recognition of the history of the area, its beauty and the way in which it has been of such solace to so many in recent times, ten per cent of sales from this show are being donated to Heath Hands, a charity which organises volunteers to maintain, conserve and educate people about the Heath.

Rachael Weitzman has lived in North London for most of her life.  She went to Chelsea College of Art and Design in 1992 and taught there for a number of years while painting and exhibiting at various galleries and art spaces in London.

For further information please contact rachaelkirkby@yahoo.co.uk

Instagram rachaelweitzman

a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX
Oct 2 @ 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm
a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX

LUX is pleased to announce an exhibition of moving image, sound and ephemera by Onyeka Igwe showing at LUX, Waterlow Park from 8th September to 17th October 2021.

Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk-in. Book here

With a forensic lens, Onyeka Igwe’s a so-called archive interrogates the decomposing repositories of Empire. Blending footage shot over 2020 in two separate colonial archive buildings—one in Lagos, Nigeria, and the other in Bristol, United Kingdom—this double portrait considers the ‘sonic shadows’ that colonial images continue to generate, despite the disintegration of their memory and their materials. Igwe’s film imagines what might have been ‘lost’ from these archives. It mixes the genres of the radio play, the corporate video tour, and detective noir, with a haunting and critical approach to the horror of discovery.

a so-called archive depicts the former vaults—along with their histories of hoarding, monetisation, documentation and now abandonment—as metonyms for the enduring entanglements between the UK and its former colonies. These sites were and continue to be home to purulent images that we cannot, will not, or choose not to see. -Mason Leaver-Yap

Igwe’s first solo exhibition at LUX a so-called archive, includes the film of the same name, as well as an outdoor audio piece and ephemeral display in the library expanding on the archives interrogated in the film. A collective reading event will also take place on Saturday 16th October – details to be announced. Audio described and captioned screenings will take place daily.

This exhibition is part of this year’s Curatorial Fellowship programme this broken piece of yard by Cairo Clarke. 


Screening Schedule

The runtime of a so-called archive is 20 minutes. The film will screen three times within a one-hour time slot. The first screening will be followed by audio described and captioned screenings. Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk in. Please check the screening schedule below. (AD: Audio Description, OC: Open Caption) 

12pm | 12.20pm (with AD) | 12.40pm (with OC)

1pm | 1.20pm (with AD) | 1.40pm (with OC)

2pm | 2.20pm (with AD) | 2.40pm (with OC)

3pm | 3.20pm (with AD) | 3.40pm (with OC)

4pm | 4.20pm (with AD) | 4.40pm (with OC)

Oct
3
Sun
Rachael Weitzman: The Heath in the Waves @ Highgate Gallery
Oct 3 @ 11:00 am – 5:00 pm

In 2020 and 2021, when waves of pandemic locked down London and elsewhere, the Heath became a place of escape and refuge for many.  Rachael Weitzman’s exhibition of paintings made during this period is a celebration of the Heath and the ancient trees that live there.

Rachael describes these paintings as ‘portraits’ of trees, the paint forming a lattice of trunks and branches, dappled with light or silhouetted against the sky – characterful and strange, rather than pretty or picturesque.  Her inspiration comes from Japanese prints as well as 20thCentury abstraction; she uses different elements to produce a particular style that conveys the solidity, scale and unique ‘personality’ of each tree.

When she first visited the Heath she was amazed at its size, losing her bearings and loving the feeling of being in an endless wilderness.  As she says, “There is something really magical about this area of woodland.  It’s so unusual, even outside London, to find such ancient trees in non-agricultural land.  The people who manage it have done such a fantastic job of maintaining it in an unspoilt way”.

It is now 150 years since an Act of Parliament saved the Heath from development, after a long campaign by activists to save it.  In recognition of the history of the area, its beauty and the way in which it has been of such solace to so many in recent times, ten per cent of sales from this show are being donated to Heath Hands, a charity which organises volunteers to maintain, conserve and educate people about the Heath.

Rachael Weitzman has lived in North London for most of her life.  She went to Chelsea College of Art and Design in 1992 and taught there for a number of years while painting and exhibiting at various galleries and art spaces in London.

For further information please contact rachaelkirkby@yahoo.co.uk

Instagram rachaelweitzman

a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX
Oct 3 @ 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm
a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX

LUX is pleased to announce an exhibition of moving image, sound and ephemera by Onyeka Igwe showing at LUX, Waterlow Park from 8th September to 17th October 2021.

Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk-in. Book here

With a forensic lens, Onyeka Igwe’s a so-called archive interrogates the decomposing repositories of Empire. Blending footage shot over 2020 in two separate colonial archive buildings—one in Lagos, Nigeria, and the other in Bristol, United Kingdom—this double portrait considers the ‘sonic shadows’ that colonial images continue to generate, despite the disintegration of their memory and their materials. Igwe’s film imagines what might have been ‘lost’ from these archives. It mixes the genres of the radio play, the corporate video tour, and detective noir, with a haunting and critical approach to the horror of discovery.

a so-called archive depicts the former vaults—along with their histories of hoarding, monetisation, documentation and now abandonment—as metonyms for the enduring entanglements between the UK and its former colonies. These sites were and continue to be home to purulent images that we cannot, will not, or choose not to see. -Mason Leaver-Yap

Igwe’s first solo exhibition at LUX a so-called archive, includes the film of the same name, as well as an outdoor audio piece and ephemeral display in the library expanding on the archives interrogated in the film. A collective reading event will also take place on Saturday 16th October – details to be announced. Audio described and captioned screenings will take place daily.

This exhibition is part of this year’s Curatorial Fellowship programme this broken piece of yard by Cairo Clarke. 


Screening Schedule

The runtime of a so-called archive is 20 minutes. The film will screen three times within a one-hour time slot. The first screening will be followed by audio described and captioned screenings. Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk in. Please check the screening schedule below. (AD: Audio Description, OC: Open Caption) 

12pm | 12.20pm (with AD) | 12.40pm (with OC)

1pm | 1.20pm (with AD) | 1.40pm (with OC)

2pm | 2.20pm (with AD) | 2.40pm (with OC)

3pm | 3.20pm (with AD) | 3.40pm (with OC)

4pm | 4.20pm (with AD) | 4.40pm (with OC)

Captain Cauliflower and Marvin the Mischievous Moose @ Jacksons Lane
Oct 3 @ 12:00 pm – 12:50 pm

Come and join the invincible Captain Cauliflower and his faithful companion Marvin on an unforgettable adventure into outer space and deep under the ocean. Packed with extreme silliness and unquestionable danger. 

Award winner for Best Children’s Event at Adelaide Fringe 2019

“Outrageously funny” British Theatre Guide

Suitable for ages 3+

Captain Cauliflower and Marvin the Mischievous Moose @ Jacksons Lane
Oct 3 @ 3:00 pm – 3:50 pm

Come and join the invincible Captain Cauliflower and his faithful companion Marvin on an unforgettable adventure into outer space and deep under the ocean. Packed with extreme silliness and unquestionable danger. 

Award winner for Best Children’s Event at Adelaide Fringe 2019

“Outrageously funny” British Theatre Guide

Suitable for ages 3+

Screening/Talk: The Light of Day, Anne Bean/Alex Eisenberg (2020) @ LUX
Oct 3 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Screening/Talk: The Light of Day, Anne Bean/Alex Eisenberg (2020) @ LUX

A special screening of The Light of Day, a unique collaborative film celebrating the life long friendship of artists Anne Bean and Jeanette Iljon.

BOOK HERE

A series of tender exchanges between life long friends Jeanette Iljon and Anne Bean. Born eleven days apart to Jewish families in Zambia in 1950, they both went on to become artists in the UK. The Light of Day carefully recomposes Iljon’s experimental, feminist and social activist film works made in the 1970s/80s. It combines these with an almost lost interview, shot by Anne Bean in 2000 and new performance material that was made with Alex Eisenberg in 2019 following Iljon’s diagnosis with dementia

To allow for social distancing the film will be shown 3 times from 3pm, followed by a discussion between Anne Bean and Alex Eisenberg at 4pm. The film is 19 minutes long and will be shown with captions.

Anne Bean has worked worldwide across the visual arts, performance, sound and video for the last fifty years. She is currently commissioned to work on a project with Zambian artists.

Alex Eisenberg is an artist and filmmaker working with performance and video. He has collaborated with Anne Bean on video projects since 2017.

Jeanette Iljon studied film at Royal College of Art. She made experimental films in the 1970s and worked with London Film-Makers’ Co-op, going on to explore social activist and feminist issues including a film about Sylvia Pankhurst with Channel 4 in the 1980’s.

Oct
4
Mon
a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX
Oct 4 @ 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm
a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX

LUX is pleased to announce an exhibition of moving image, sound and ephemera by Onyeka Igwe showing at LUX, Waterlow Park from 8th September to 17th October 2021.

Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk-in. Book here

With a forensic lens, Onyeka Igwe’s a so-called archive interrogates the decomposing repositories of Empire. Blending footage shot over 2020 in two separate colonial archive buildings—one in Lagos, Nigeria, and the other in Bristol, United Kingdom—this double portrait considers the ‘sonic shadows’ that colonial images continue to generate, despite the disintegration of their memory and their materials. Igwe’s film imagines what might have been ‘lost’ from these archives. It mixes the genres of the radio play, the corporate video tour, and detective noir, with a haunting and critical approach to the horror of discovery.

a so-called archive depicts the former vaults—along with their histories of hoarding, monetisation, documentation and now abandonment—as metonyms for the enduring entanglements between the UK and its former colonies. These sites were and continue to be home to purulent images that we cannot, will not, or choose not to see. -Mason Leaver-Yap

Igwe’s first solo exhibition at LUX a so-called archive, includes the film of the same name, as well as an outdoor audio piece and ephemeral display in the library expanding on the archives interrogated in the film. A collective reading event will also take place on Saturday 16th October – details to be announced. Audio described and captioned screenings will take place daily.

This exhibition is part of this year’s Curatorial Fellowship programme this broken piece of yard by Cairo Clarke. 


Screening Schedule

The runtime of a so-called archive is 20 minutes. The film will screen three times within a one-hour time slot. The first screening will be followed by audio described and captioned screenings. Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk in. Please check the screening schedule below. (AD: Audio Description, OC: Open Caption) 

12pm | 12.20pm (with AD) | 12.40pm (with OC)

1pm | 1.20pm (with AD) | 1.40pm (with OC)

2pm | 2.20pm (with AD) | 2.40pm (with OC)

3pm | 3.20pm (with AD) | 3.40pm (with OC)

4pm | 4.20pm (with AD) | 4.40pm (with OC)

Oct
5
Tue
a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX
Oct 5 @ 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm
a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX

LUX is pleased to announce an exhibition of moving image, sound and ephemera by Onyeka Igwe showing at LUX, Waterlow Park from 8th September to 17th October 2021.

Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk-in. Book here

With a forensic lens, Onyeka Igwe’s a so-called archive interrogates the decomposing repositories of Empire. Blending footage shot over 2020 in two separate colonial archive buildings—one in Lagos, Nigeria, and the other in Bristol, United Kingdom—this double portrait considers the ‘sonic shadows’ that colonial images continue to generate, despite the disintegration of their memory and their materials. Igwe’s film imagines what might have been ‘lost’ from these archives. It mixes the genres of the radio play, the corporate video tour, and detective noir, with a haunting and critical approach to the horror of discovery.

a so-called archive depicts the former vaults—along with their histories of hoarding, monetisation, documentation and now abandonment—as metonyms for the enduring entanglements between the UK and its former colonies. These sites were and continue to be home to purulent images that we cannot, will not, or choose not to see. -Mason Leaver-Yap

Igwe’s first solo exhibition at LUX a so-called archive, includes the film of the same name, as well as an outdoor audio piece and ephemeral display in the library expanding on the archives interrogated in the film. A collective reading event will also take place on Saturday 16th October – details to be announced. Audio described and captioned screenings will take place daily.

This exhibition is part of this year’s Curatorial Fellowship programme this broken piece of yard by Cairo Clarke. 


Screening Schedule

The runtime of a so-called archive is 20 minutes. The film will screen three times within a one-hour time slot. The first screening will be followed by audio described and captioned screenings. Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk in. Please check the screening schedule below. (AD: Audio Description, OC: Open Caption) 

12pm | 12.20pm (with AD) | 12.40pm (with OC)

1pm | 1.20pm (with AD) | 1.40pm (with OC)

2pm | 2.20pm (with AD) | 2.40pm (with OC)

3pm | 3.20pm (with AD) | 3.40pm (with OC)

4pm | 4.20pm (with AD) | 4.40pm (with OC)

Rachael Weitzman: The Heath in the Waves @ Highgate Gallery
Oct 5 @ 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm

In 2020 and 2021, when waves of pandemic locked down London and elsewhere, the Heath became a place of escape and refuge for many.  Rachael Weitzman’s exhibition of paintings made during this period is a celebration of the Heath and the ancient trees that live there.

Rachael describes these paintings as ‘portraits’ of trees, the paint forming a lattice of trunks and branches, dappled with light or silhouetted against the sky – characterful and strange, rather than pretty or picturesque.  Her inspiration comes from Japanese prints as well as 20thCentury abstraction; she uses different elements to produce a particular style that conveys the solidity, scale and unique ‘personality’ of each tree.

When she first visited the Heath she was amazed at its size, losing her bearings and loving the feeling of being in an endless wilderness.  As she says, “There is something really magical about this area of woodland.  It’s so unusual, even outside London, to find such ancient trees in non-agricultural land.  The people who manage it have done such a fantastic job of maintaining it in an unspoilt way”.

It is now 150 years since an Act of Parliament saved the Heath from development, after a long campaign by activists to save it.  In recognition of the history of the area, its beauty and the way in which it has been of such solace to so many in recent times, ten per cent of sales from this show are being donated to Heath Hands, a charity which organises volunteers to maintain, conserve and educate people about the Heath.

Rachael Weitzman has lived in North London for most of her life.  She went to Chelsea College of Art and Design in 1992 and taught there for a number of years while painting and exhibiting at various galleries and art spaces in London.

For further information please contact rachaelkirkby@yahoo.co.uk

Instagram rachaelweitzman

 

Ves-tigios @ Jacksons Lane
Oct 5 @ 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Circolombia, live at Coventry Assembly Festival Garden, Coventry City of Culture 2021.

London premiere

A rare chance to see the internationally acclaimed Circolombia in a more intimate setting. Vest-igios fuses stunning physical performance with film to create a remarkable visual journey infused with extravagant visions, terrifying acrobatics and unthinkable magic moments.

Oct
6
Wed
a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX
Oct 6 @ 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm
a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX

LUX is pleased to announce an exhibition of moving image, sound and ephemera by Onyeka Igwe showing at LUX, Waterlow Park from 8th September to 17th October 2021.

Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk-in. Book here

With a forensic lens, Onyeka Igwe’s a so-called archive interrogates the decomposing repositories of Empire. Blending footage shot over 2020 in two separate colonial archive buildings—one in Lagos, Nigeria, and the other in Bristol, United Kingdom—this double portrait considers the ‘sonic shadows’ that colonial images continue to generate, despite the disintegration of their memory and their materials. Igwe’s film imagines what might have been ‘lost’ from these archives. It mixes the genres of the radio play, the corporate video tour, and detective noir, with a haunting and critical approach to the horror of discovery.

a so-called archive depicts the former vaults—along with their histories of hoarding, monetisation, documentation and now abandonment—as metonyms for the enduring entanglements between the UK and its former colonies. These sites were and continue to be home to purulent images that we cannot, will not, or choose not to see. -Mason Leaver-Yap

Igwe’s first solo exhibition at LUX a so-called archive, includes the film of the same name, as well as an outdoor audio piece and ephemeral display in the library expanding on the archives interrogated in the film. A collective reading event will also take place on Saturday 16th October – details to be announced. Audio described and captioned screenings will take place daily.

This exhibition is part of this year’s Curatorial Fellowship programme this broken piece of yard by Cairo Clarke. 


Screening Schedule

The runtime of a so-called archive is 20 minutes. The film will screen three times within a one-hour time slot. The first screening will be followed by audio described and captioned screenings. Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk in. Please check the screening schedule below. (AD: Audio Description, OC: Open Caption) 

12pm | 12.20pm (with AD) | 12.40pm (with OC)

1pm | 1.20pm (with AD) | 1.40pm (with OC)

2pm | 2.20pm (with AD) | 2.40pm (with OC)

3pm | 3.20pm (with AD) | 3.40pm (with OC)

4pm | 4.20pm (with AD) | 4.40pm (with OC)

Rachael Weitzman: The Heath in the Waves @ Highgate Gallery
Oct 6 @ 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm

In 2020 and 2021, when waves of pandemic locked down London and elsewhere, the Heath became a place of escape and refuge for many.  Rachael Weitzman’s exhibition of paintings made during this period is a celebration of the Heath and the ancient trees that live there.

Rachael describes these paintings as ‘portraits’ of trees, the paint forming a lattice of trunks and branches, dappled with light or silhouetted against the sky – characterful and strange, rather than pretty or picturesque.  Her inspiration comes from Japanese prints as well as 20thCentury abstraction; she uses different elements to produce a particular style that conveys the solidity, scale and unique ‘personality’ of each tree.

When she first visited the Heath she was amazed at its size, losing her bearings and loving the feeling of being in an endless wilderness.  As she says, “There is something really magical about this area of woodland.  It’s so unusual, even outside London, to find such ancient trees in non-agricultural land.  The people who manage it have done such a fantastic job of maintaining it in an unspoilt way”.

It is now 150 years since an Act of Parliament saved the Heath from development, after a long campaign by activists to save it.  In recognition of the history of the area, its beauty and the way in which it has been of such solace to so many in recent times, ten per cent of sales from this show are being donated to Heath Hands, a charity which organises volunteers to maintain, conserve and educate people about the Heath.

Rachael Weitzman has lived in North London for most of her life.  She went to Chelsea College of Art and Design in 1992 and taught there for a number of years while painting and exhibiting at various galleries and art spaces in London.

For further information please contact rachaelkirkby@yahoo.co.uk

Instagram rachaelweitzman

 

Ves-tigios @ Jacksons Lane
Oct 6 @ 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Circolombia, live at Coventry Assembly Festival Garden, Coventry City of Culture 2021.

London premiere

A rare chance to see the internationally acclaimed Circolombia in a more intimate setting. Vest-igios fuses stunning physical performance with film to create a remarkable visual journey infused with extravagant visions, terrifying acrobatics and unthinkable magic moments.

French Circle: Dégustation vins et fromages @ Highgate Society
Oct 6 @ 8:00 pm – 10:00 pm

Everyone welcome to join us for French cheese and wine and conversation!

Oct
7
Thu
a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX
Oct 7 @ 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm
a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX

LUX is pleased to announce an exhibition of moving image, sound and ephemera by Onyeka Igwe showing at LUX, Waterlow Park from 8th September to 17th October 2021.

Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk-in. Book here

With a forensic lens, Onyeka Igwe’s a so-called archive interrogates the decomposing repositories of Empire. Blending footage shot over 2020 in two separate colonial archive buildings—one in Lagos, Nigeria, and the other in Bristol, United Kingdom—this double portrait considers the ‘sonic shadows’ that colonial images continue to generate, despite the disintegration of their memory and their materials. Igwe’s film imagines what might have been ‘lost’ from these archives. It mixes the genres of the radio play, the corporate video tour, and detective noir, with a haunting and critical approach to the horror of discovery.

a so-called archive depicts the former vaults—along with their histories of hoarding, monetisation, documentation and now abandonment—as metonyms for the enduring entanglements between the UK and its former colonies. These sites were and continue to be home to purulent images that we cannot, will not, or choose not to see. -Mason Leaver-Yap

Igwe’s first solo exhibition at LUX a so-called archive, includes the film of the same name, as well as an outdoor audio piece and ephemeral display in the library expanding on the archives interrogated in the film. A collective reading event will also take place on Saturday 16th October – details to be announced. Audio described and captioned screenings will take place daily.

This exhibition is part of this year’s Curatorial Fellowship programme this broken piece of yard by Cairo Clarke. 


Screening Schedule

The runtime of a so-called archive is 20 minutes. The film will screen three times within a one-hour time slot. The first screening will be followed by audio described and captioned screenings. Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk in. Please check the screening schedule below. (AD: Audio Description, OC: Open Caption) 

12pm | 12.20pm (with AD) | 12.40pm (with OC)

1pm | 1.20pm (with AD) | 1.40pm (with OC)

2pm | 2.20pm (with AD) | 2.40pm (with OC)

3pm | 3.20pm (with AD) | 3.40pm (with OC)

4pm | 4.20pm (with AD) | 4.40pm (with OC)

Rachael Weitzman: The Heath in the Waves @ Highgate Gallery
Oct 7 @ 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm

In 2020 and 2021, when waves of pandemic locked down London and elsewhere, the Heath became a place of escape and refuge for many.  Rachael Weitzman’s exhibition of paintings made during this period is a celebration of the Heath and the ancient trees that live there.

Rachael describes these paintings as ‘portraits’ of trees, the paint forming a lattice of trunks and branches, dappled with light or silhouetted against the sky – characterful and strange, rather than pretty or picturesque.  Her inspiration comes from Japanese prints as well as 20thCentury abstraction; she uses different elements to produce a particular style that conveys the solidity, scale and unique ‘personality’ of each tree.

When she first visited the Heath she was amazed at its size, losing her bearings and loving the feeling of being in an endless wilderness.  As she says, “There is something really magical about this area of woodland.  It’s so unusual, even outside London, to find such ancient trees in non-agricultural land.  The people who manage it have done such a fantastic job of maintaining it in an unspoilt way”.

It is now 150 years since an Act of Parliament saved the Heath from development, after a long campaign by activists to save it.  In recognition of the history of the area, its beauty and the way in which it has been of such solace to so many in recent times, ten per cent of sales from this show are being donated to Heath Hands, a charity which organises volunteers to maintain, conserve and educate people about the Heath.

Rachael Weitzman has lived in North London for most of her life.  She went to Chelsea College of Art and Design in 1992 and taught there for a number of years while painting and exhibiting at various galleries and art spaces in London.

For further information please contact rachaelkirkby@yahoo.co.uk

Instagram rachaelweitzman

 

Ves-tigios @ Jacksons Lane
Oct 7 @ 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Circolombia, live at Coventry Assembly Festival Garden, Coventry City of Culture 2021.

London premiere

A rare chance to see the internationally acclaimed Circolombia in a more intimate setting. Vest-igios fuses stunning physical performance with film to create a remarkable visual journey infused with extravagant visions, terrifying acrobatics and unthinkable magic moments.

Oct
8
Fri
Friday Life Drawing Workshops @ Lauderdale House
Oct 8 @ 10:30 am – 1:00 pm

A uniquely structured workshop intended to develop the artist through a variety of creative and technical exercises aimed at unlocking individual creativity. Taught by experienced tutor Clare Grossman, this class is suitable for the beginner and experienced artist alike.

Clare taught at Lauderdale House previously under Fernside Life Classes, which she founded in 1996. This is a new series of monthly life drawing workshops put together by the Lauderdale House team in collaboration with Clare.

Each session starts with an inspirational quotation by a great philosopher, artist or writer. The sessions feature one professional life model who will hold a variety of long and short poses. Sessions are structured by the tutor, who is also happy to enable students to work independently too – the aim of these sessions is to build confidence and ability, culminating in a wide variety of original drawing, with students developing their own unique style and work.

Life Drawing at Lauderdale House @ Lauderdale House
Oct 8 @ 10:30 am – 4:00 pm
a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX
Oct 8 @ 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm
a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX

LUX is pleased to announce an exhibition of moving image, sound and ephemera by Onyeka Igwe showing at LUX, Waterlow Park from 8th September to 17th October 2021.

Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk-in. Book here

With a forensic lens, Onyeka Igwe’s a so-called archive interrogates the decomposing repositories of Empire. Blending footage shot over 2020 in two separate colonial archive buildings—one in Lagos, Nigeria, and the other in Bristol, United Kingdom—this double portrait considers the ‘sonic shadows’ that colonial images continue to generate, despite the disintegration of their memory and their materials. Igwe’s film imagines what might have been ‘lost’ from these archives. It mixes the genres of the radio play, the corporate video tour, and detective noir, with a haunting and critical approach to the horror of discovery.

a so-called archive depicts the former vaults—along with their histories of hoarding, monetisation, documentation and now abandonment—as metonyms for the enduring entanglements between the UK and its former colonies. These sites were and continue to be home to purulent images that we cannot, will not, or choose not to see. -Mason Leaver-Yap

Igwe’s first solo exhibition at LUX a so-called archive, includes the film of the same name, as well as an outdoor audio piece and ephemeral display in the library expanding on the archives interrogated in the film. A collective reading event will also take place on Saturday 16th October – details to be announced. Audio described and captioned screenings will take place daily.

This exhibition is part of this year’s Curatorial Fellowship programme this broken piece of yard by Cairo Clarke. 


Screening Schedule

The runtime of a so-called archive is 20 minutes. The film will screen three times within a one-hour time slot. The first screening will be followed by audio described and captioned screenings. Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk in. Please check the screening schedule below. (AD: Audio Description, OC: Open Caption) 

12pm | 12.20pm (with AD) | 12.40pm (with OC)

1pm | 1.20pm (with AD) | 1.40pm (with OC)

2pm | 2.20pm (with AD) | 2.40pm (with OC)

3pm | 3.20pm (with AD) | 3.40pm (with OC)

4pm | 4.20pm (with AD) | 4.40pm (with OC)

Rachael Weitzman: The Heath in the Waves @ Highgate Gallery
Oct 8 @ 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm

In 2020 and 2021, when waves of pandemic locked down London and elsewhere, the Heath became a place of escape and refuge for many.  Rachael Weitzman’s exhibition of paintings made during this period is a celebration of the Heath and the ancient trees that live there.

Rachael describes these paintings as ‘portraits’ of trees, the paint forming a lattice of trunks and branches, dappled with light or silhouetted against the sky – characterful and strange, rather than pretty or picturesque.  Her inspiration comes from Japanese prints as well as 20thCentury abstraction; she uses different elements to produce a particular style that conveys the solidity, scale and unique ‘personality’ of each tree.

When she first visited the Heath she was amazed at its size, losing her bearings and loving the feeling of being in an endless wilderness.  As she says, “There is something really magical about this area of woodland.  It’s so unusual, even outside London, to find such ancient trees in non-agricultural land.  The people who manage it have done such a fantastic job of maintaining it in an unspoilt way”.

It is now 150 years since an Act of Parliament saved the Heath from development, after a long campaign by activists to save it.  In recognition of the history of the area, its beauty and the way in which it has been of such solace to so many in recent times, ten per cent of sales from this show are being donated to Heath Hands, a charity which organises volunteers to maintain, conserve and educate people about the Heath.

Rachael Weitzman has lived in North London for most of her life.  She went to Chelsea College of Art and Design in 1992 and taught there for a number of years while painting and exhibiting at various galleries and art spaces in London.

For further information please contact rachaelkirkby@yahoo.co.uk

Instagram rachaelweitzman

 

Friday Life Drawing Workshops @ Lauderdale House
Oct 8 @ 2:00 pm – 4:30 pm

A uniquely structured workshop intended to develop the artist through a variety of creative and technical exercises aimed at unlocking individual creativity. Taught by experienced tutor Clare Grossman, this class is suitable for the beginner and experienced artist alike.

Clare taught at Lauderdale House previously under Fernside Life Classes, which she founded in 1996. This is a new series of monthly life drawing workshops put together by the Lauderdale House team in collaboration with Clare.

Each session starts with an inspirational quotation by a great philosopher, artist or writer. The sessions feature one professional life model who will hold a variety of long and short poses. Sessions are structured by the tutor, who is also happy to enable students to work independently too – the aim of these sessions is to build confidence and ability, culminating in a wide variety of original drawing, with students developing their own unique style and work.

Booking Information

Each session is 2 and half hours long. You can take part in the full day workshop by booking onto both the morning and afternoon sessions – a £5 discount will automatically be applied at check out.

Prefer shorter classes? You can book onto either the morning or afternoon session separately.

If you’d like to book over the phone or have any questions regarding the workshop you can contact the Lauderdale House team on 020 8348 8716.

Ves-tigios @ Jacksons Lane
Oct 8 @ 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Circolombia, live at Coventry Assembly Festival Garden, Coventry City of Culture 2021.

London premiere

A rare chance to see the internationally acclaimed Circolombia in a more intimate setting. Vest-igios fuses stunning physical performance with film to create a remarkable visual journey infused with extravagant visions, terrifying acrobatics and unthinkable magic moments.

Oct
9
Sat
Rachael Weitzman: The Heath in the Waves @ Highgate Gallery
Oct 9 @ 11:00 am – 4:00 pm

In 2020 and 2021, when waves of pandemic locked down London and elsewhere, the Heath became a place of escape and refuge for many.  Rachael Weitzman’s exhibition of paintings made during this period is a celebration of the Heath and the ancient trees that live there.

Rachael describes these paintings as ‘portraits’ of trees, the paint forming a lattice of trunks and branches, dappled with light or silhouetted against the sky – characterful and strange, rather than pretty or picturesque.  Her inspiration comes from Japanese prints as well as 20thCentury abstraction; she uses different elements to produce a particular style that conveys the solidity, scale and unique ‘personality’ of each tree.

When she first visited the Heath she was amazed at its size, losing her bearings and loving the feeling of being in an endless wilderness.  As she says, “There is something really magical about this area of woodland.  It’s so unusual, even outside London, to find such ancient trees in non-agricultural land.  The people who manage it have done such a fantastic job of maintaining it in an unspoilt way”.

It is now 150 years since an Act of Parliament saved the Heath from development, after a long campaign by activists to save it.  In recognition of the history of the area, its beauty and the way in which it has been of such solace to so many in recent times, ten per cent of sales from this show are being donated to Heath Hands, a charity which organises volunteers to maintain, conserve and educate people about the Heath.

Rachael Weitzman has lived in North London for most of her life.  She went to Chelsea College of Art and Design in 1992 and taught there for a number of years while painting and exhibiting at various galleries and art spaces in London.

For further information please contact rachaelkirkby@yahoo.co.uk

Instagram rachaelweitzman

a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX
Oct 9 @ 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm
a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX

LUX is pleased to announce an exhibition of moving image, sound and ephemera by Onyeka Igwe showing at LUX, Waterlow Park from 8th September to 17th October 2021.

Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk-in. Book here

With a forensic lens, Onyeka Igwe’s a so-called archive interrogates the decomposing repositories of Empire. Blending footage shot over 2020 in two separate colonial archive buildings—one in Lagos, Nigeria, and the other in Bristol, United Kingdom—this double portrait considers the ‘sonic shadows’ that colonial images continue to generate, despite the disintegration of their memory and their materials. Igwe’s film imagines what might have been ‘lost’ from these archives. It mixes the genres of the radio play, the corporate video tour, and detective noir, with a haunting and critical approach to the horror of discovery.

a so-called archive depicts the former vaults—along with their histories of hoarding, monetisation, documentation and now abandonment—as metonyms for the enduring entanglements between the UK and its former colonies. These sites were and continue to be home to purulent images that we cannot, will not, or choose not to see. -Mason Leaver-Yap

Igwe’s first solo exhibition at LUX a so-called archive, includes the film of the same name, as well as an outdoor audio piece and ephemeral display in the library expanding on the archives interrogated in the film. A collective reading event will also take place on Saturday 16th October – details to be announced. Audio described and captioned screenings will take place daily.

This exhibition is part of this year’s Curatorial Fellowship programme this broken piece of yard by Cairo Clarke. 


Screening Schedule

The runtime of a so-called archive is 20 minutes. The film will screen three times within a one-hour time slot. The first screening will be followed by audio described and captioned screenings. Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk in. Please check the screening schedule below. (AD: Audio Description, OC: Open Caption) 

12pm | 12.20pm (with AD) | 12.40pm (with OC)

1pm | 1.20pm (with AD) | 1.40pm (with OC)

2pm | 2.20pm (with AD) | 2.40pm (with OC)

3pm | 3.20pm (with AD) | 3.40pm (with OC)

4pm | 4.20pm (with AD) | 4.40pm (with OC)

Saturdays at Six – Exonian Choir @ St Michael's Church, Highgate
Oct 9 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Oct
10
Sun
Rachael Weitzman: The Heath in the Waves @ Highgate Gallery
Oct 10 @ 11:00 am – 5:00 pm

In 2020 and 2021, when waves of pandemic locked down London and elsewhere, the Heath became a place of escape and refuge for many.  Rachael Weitzman’s exhibition of paintings made during this period is a celebration of the Heath and the ancient trees that live there.

Rachael describes these paintings as ‘portraits’ of trees, the paint forming a lattice of trunks and branches, dappled with light or silhouetted against the sky – characterful and strange, rather than pretty or picturesque.  Her inspiration comes from Japanese prints as well as 20thCentury abstraction; she uses different elements to produce a particular style that conveys the solidity, scale and unique ‘personality’ of each tree.

When she first visited the Heath she was amazed at its size, losing her bearings and loving the feeling of being in an endless wilderness.  As she says, “There is something really magical about this area of woodland.  It’s so unusual, even outside London, to find such ancient trees in non-agricultural land.  The people who manage it have done such a fantastic job of maintaining it in an unspoilt way”.

It is now 150 years since an Act of Parliament saved the Heath from development, after a long campaign by activists to save it.  In recognition of the history of the area, its beauty and the way in which it has been of such solace to so many in recent times, ten per cent of sales from this show are being donated to Heath Hands, a charity which organises volunteers to maintain, conserve and educate people about the Heath.

Rachael Weitzman has lived in North London for most of her life.  She went to Chelsea College of Art and Design in 1992 and taught there for a number of years while painting and exhibiting at various galleries and art spaces in London.

For further information please contact rachaelkirkby@yahoo.co.uk

Instagram rachaelweitzman

a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX
Oct 10 @ 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm
a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX

LUX is pleased to announce an exhibition of moving image, sound and ephemera by Onyeka Igwe showing at LUX, Waterlow Park from 8th September to 17th October 2021.

Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk-in. Book here

With a forensic lens, Onyeka Igwe’s a so-called archive interrogates the decomposing repositories of Empire. Blending footage shot over 2020 in two separate colonial archive buildings—one in Lagos, Nigeria, and the other in Bristol, United Kingdom—this double portrait considers the ‘sonic shadows’ that colonial images continue to generate, despite the disintegration of their memory and their materials. Igwe’s film imagines what might have been ‘lost’ from these archives. It mixes the genres of the radio play, the corporate video tour, and detective noir, with a haunting and critical approach to the horror of discovery.

a so-called archive depicts the former vaults—along with their histories of hoarding, monetisation, documentation and now abandonment—as metonyms for the enduring entanglements between the UK and its former colonies. These sites were and continue to be home to purulent images that we cannot, will not, or choose not to see. -Mason Leaver-Yap

Igwe’s first solo exhibition at LUX a so-called archive, includes the film of the same name, as well as an outdoor audio piece and ephemeral display in the library expanding on the archives interrogated in the film. A collective reading event will also take place on Saturday 16th October – details to be announced. Audio described and captioned screenings will take place daily.

This exhibition is part of this year’s Curatorial Fellowship programme this broken piece of yard by Cairo Clarke. 


Screening Schedule

The runtime of a so-called archive is 20 minutes. The film will screen three times within a one-hour time slot. The first screening will be followed by audio described and captioned screenings. Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk in. Please check the screening schedule below. (AD: Audio Description, OC: Open Caption) 

12pm | 12.20pm (with AD) | 12.40pm (with OC)

1pm | 1.20pm (with AD) | 1.40pm (with OC)

2pm | 2.20pm (with AD) | 2.40pm (with OC)

3pm | 3.20pm (with AD) | 3.40pm (with OC)

4pm | 4.20pm (with AD) | 4.40pm (with OC)

Oct
11
Mon
a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX
Oct 11 @ 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm
a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX

LUX is pleased to announce an exhibition of moving image, sound and ephemera by Onyeka Igwe showing at LUX, Waterlow Park from 8th September to 17th October 2021.

Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk-in. Book here

With a forensic lens, Onyeka Igwe’s a so-called archive interrogates the decomposing repositories of Empire. Blending footage shot over 2020 in two separate colonial archive buildings—one in Lagos, Nigeria, and the other in Bristol, United Kingdom—this double portrait considers the ‘sonic shadows’ that colonial images continue to generate, despite the disintegration of their memory and their materials. Igwe’s film imagines what might have been ‘lost’ from these archives. It mixes the genres of the radio play, the corporate video tour, and detective noir, with a haunting and critical approach to the horror of discovery.

a so-called archive depicts the former vaults—along with their histories of hoarding, monetisation, documentation and now abandonment—as metonyms for the enduring entanglements between the UK and its former colonies. These sites were and continue to be home to purulent images that we cannot, will not, or choose not to see. -Mason Leaver-Yap

Igwe’s first solo exhibition at LUX a so-called archive, includes the film of the same name, as well as an outdoor audio piece and ephemeral display in the library expanding on the archives interrogated in the film. A collective reading event will also take place on Saturday 16th October – details to be announced. Audio described and captioned screenings will take place daily.

This exhibition is part of this year’s Curatorial Fellowship programme this broken piece of yard by Cairo Clarke. 


Screening Schedule

The runtime of a so-called archive is 20 minutes. The film will screen three times within a one-hour time slot. The first screening will be followed by audio described and captioned screenings. Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk in. Please check the screening schedule below. (AD: Audio Description, OC: Open Caption) 

12pm | 12.20pm (with AD) | 12.40pm (with OC)

1pm | 1.20pm (with AD) | 1.40pm (with OC)

2pm | 2.20pm (with AD) | 2.40pm (with OC)

3pm | 3.20pm (with AD) | 3.40pm (with OC)

4pm | 4.20pm (with AD) | 4.40pm (with OC)

Oct
12
Tue
a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX
Oct 12 @ 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm
a so-called archive, Onyeka Igwe @ LUX

LUX is pleased to announce an exhibition of moving image, sound and ephemera by Onyeka Igwe showing at LUX, Waterlow Park from 8th September to 17th October 2021.

Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk-in. Book here

With a forensic lens, Onyeka Igwe’s a so-called archive interrogates the decomposing repositories of Empire. Blending footage shot over 2020 in two separate colonial archive buildings—one in Lagos, Nigeria, and the other in Bristol, United Kingdom—this double portrait considers the ‘sonic shadows’ that colonial images continue to generate, despite the disintegration of their memory and their materials. Igwe’s film imagines what might have been ‘lost’ from these archives. It mixes the genres of the radio play, the corporate video tour, and detective noir, with a haunting and critical approach to the horror of discovery.

a so-called archive depicts the former vaults—along with their histories of hoarding, monetisation, documentation and now abandonment—as metonyms for the enduring entanglements between the UK and its former colonies. These sites were and continue to be home to purulent images that we cannot, will not, or choose not to see. -Mason Leaver-Yap

Igwe’s first solo exhibition at LUX a so-called archive, includes the film of the same name, as well as an outdoor audio piece and ephemeral display in the library expanding on the archives interrogated in the film. A collective reading event will also take place on Saturday 16th October – details to be announced. Audio described and captioned screenings will take place daily.

This exhibition is part of this year’s Curatorial Fellowship programme this broken piece of yard by Cairo Clarke. 


Screening Schedule

The runtime of a so-called archive is 20 minutes. The film will screen three times within a one-hour time slot. The first screening will be followed by audio described and captioned screenings. Booking is encouraged but you are welcome to walk in. Please check the screening schedule below. (AD: Audio Description, OC: Open Caption) 

12pm | 12.20pm (with AD) | 12.40pm (with OC)

1pm | 1.20pm (with AD) | 1.40pm (with OC)

2pm | 2.20pm (with AD) | 2.40pm (with OC)

3pm | 3.20pm (with AD) | 3.40pm (with OC)

4pm | 4.20pm (with AD) | 4.40pm (with OC)