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Feb
20
Thu
Printmakers Council: TIME @ Highgate Gallery
Feb 20 @ 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Dutch Dodo  photopolymer print with chine collé, 61.5×56.5cm Tammy Mackay 2019. All rights reserved

Printmakers Council: TIME

The Printmakers Council invites you to find the time to join them in exploring the concept of Time in both traditional and innovative forms printmaking. Determined historically by the rising and the setting of the sun, our modern lifestyles push against the natural rhythms of rest and labour and our now 24-hour economy urges consumer purchasing of smart watches.  It’s not just telling the time but scheduling what to do with it.  Meanwhile astrophysical research challenges our understanding of time itself.  The Printmakers explore our complex relationship with time, a fascinating and engrossing subject for us all.

All work is for sale.

Events: 

15 minute talks Sunday 9th February 2-3pm.

Create a print in a 10 minutes.  Workshop on Sunday 16th February 2-4pm.

Founded in 1965 by artists including Julian Trevelyan, Michael Rothenstein, Anthony Gross and Agatha Sorel, the Printmakers Council promotes the place of printmaking in the visual arts by:

  • Providing information on prints and printmaking to its 250 members and the public
    • Encouraging co-operation and exchanges between artists, galleries and printmaking studios and associations
    • Holding regular exhibitions of original prints in the UK and abroad

 Website: https://printmakerscouncil.com

Exhibition continues until 20 February.

Highgate Gallery open Tuesday-Friday 1-5pm, Saturday 11am-4pm, Sunday 11am-5pm; closed Mondays

Mar
6
Fri
Keith Hammond: Organic Origins. @ Highgate Gallery
Mar 6 @ 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Keith Hammond, Japanese Maple

ORGANIC ORIGINS.  Photographic Artworks by Keith Hammond

 Artist and photographer Keith Hammond’s first solo exhibition at the Highgate Gallery in London takes a radical departure to nature photography.

Entitled Organic Origins, the exhibition showcases 14 of Hammond’s landscape works.  Mostly taken in north London’s open spaces, including Hampstead Heath and Waterlow Park close to the gallery, each has a different theme, from Japanese Maple (2014) to Water Iris Shoots (2015), Frost on Leaf and Grass (2015) and Arching Beech (2016).

In these large-scale works, Hammond’s intention is to explore the way we look at nature.  Rather than use a single shot composed in the picturesque tradition, he takes a radical approach, using a grid system that investigates each landscape from multiple viewpoints.  Hammond then incorporates these smaller images and details into each finished image, making works that are more than the sum of their parts, and which reward repeated viewing.

The artworks in Organic Origins also invite comparison with other artists such as Gilbert and George and David Hockney, whose workshops he has attended. Hammond’s use of “joiners” (the photographic term for smaller images that combine to compose a larger picture) itself questions the act of perception, inviting a re-evaluation of photographic truth and the single “decisive moment”. Instead, his artworks respond to the way the eye actually works in nature: sometimes near, sometimes far, always restless.

“We don’t look at a beautiful tree or a landscape for just a split second. We take our time, our eyes wander all over the scene, we take it all in; the leaves shake in the wind, the waters ripple, the clouds move, the light changes. Nothing is static.”  Keith Hammond, 2019

Hammond also works on his images post-production.  Several of the landscapes in Organic Origins have been digitally manipulated to bring out details that are unattainable within the normal colour spectrum.  The intention is to gain a wider harmony in the image – and express a wider truth about the relationship between the viewer and the natural world.

“I want to connect with something essential about the natural world; something that is palpably already there if we just take the time to look.” Keith Hammond, 2019.

“I have had a passion for trees since I was a small girl.  If you’re similarly attracted to their changing colours and shapes, please spend time at Keith Hammond’s exhibition at the Highgate Gallery.  He is a remarkable photographer.”  Dame Judi Dench, 2020.

 The artworks are for sale. From a series of 50 images, the 14 limited-edition works in the exhibition range from 1-2.5m in size. Prices £1,000-£4,000.

About Keith Hammond

A photographer since the 1960s, Keith Hammond has had a long career as an artist and photographer.  In 1998-99 he was invited to judge the John Kobal Portrait Award (now Taylor Wessing) exhibited at the National Portrait Gallery, London.  2014 Art for Art Sake, Cork St Gallery, London.

www.keithhammond.co.uk

Exhibition continues until 19 March.

Highgate Gallery open Tuesday-Friday 1-5pm, Saturday 11am-4pm, Sunday 11am-5pm; closed Mondays

Mar
7
Sat
Keith Hammond: Organic Origins. @ Highgate Gallery
Mar 7 @ 11:00 am – 4:00 pm
Keith Hammond, Japanese Maple

ORGANIC ORIGINS.  Photographic Artworks by Keith Hammond

 Artist and photographer Keith Hammond’s first solo exhibition at the Highgate Gallery in London takes a radical departure to nature photography.

Entitled Organic Origins, the exhibition showcases 14 of Hammond’s landscape works.  Mostly taken in north London’s open spaces, including Hampstead Heath and Waterlow Park close to the gallery, each has a different theme, from Japanese Maple (2014) to Water Iris Shoots (2015), Frost on Leaf and Grass (2015) and Arching Beech (2016).

In these large-scale works, Hammond’s intention is to explore the way we look at nature.  Rather than use a single shot composed in the picturesque tradition, he takes a radical approach, using a grid system that investigates each landscape from multiple viewpoints.  Hammond then incorporates these smaller images and details into each finished image, making works that are more than the sum of their parts, and which reward repeated viewing.

The artworks in Organic Origins also invite comparison with other artists such as Gilbert and George and David Hockney, whose workshops he has attended. Hammond’s use of “joiners” (the photographic term for smaller images that combine to compose a larger picture) itself questions the act of perception, inviting a re-evaluation of photographic truth and the single “decisive moment”. Instead, his artworks respond to the way the eye actually works in nature: sometimes near, sometimes far, always restless.

“We don’t look at a beautiful tree or a landscape for just a split second. We take our time, our eyes wander all over the scene, we take it all in; the leaves shake in the wind, the waters ripple, the clouds move, the light changes. Nothing is static.”  Keith Hammond, 2019

Hammond also works on his images post-production.  Several of the landscapes in Organic Origins have been digitally manipulated to bring out details that are unattainable within the normal colour spectrum.  The intention is to gain a wider harmony in the image – and express a wider truth about the relationship between the viewer and the natural world.

“I want to connect with something essential about the natural world; something that is palpably already there if we just take the time to look.” Keith Hammond, 2019.

“I have had a passion for trees since I was a small girl.  If you’re similarly attracted to their changing colours and shapes, please spend time at Keith Hammond’s exhibition at the Highgate Gallery.  He is a remarkable photographer.”  Dame Judi Dench, 2020.

 The artworks are for sale. From a series of 50 images, the 14 limited-edition works in the exhibition range from 1-2.5m in size. Prices £1,000-£4,000.

About Keith Hammond

A photographer since the 1960s, Keith Hammond has had a long career as an artist and photographer.  In 1998-99 he was invited to judge the John Kobal Portrait Award (now Taylor Wessing) exhibited at the National Portrait Gallery, London.  2014 Art for Art Sake, Cork St Gallery, London.

www.keithhammond.co.uk

Exhibition continues until 19 March.

Highgate Gallery open Tuesday-Friday 1-5pm, Saturday 11am-4pm, Sunday 11am-5pm; closed Mondays

Mar
8
Sun
Keith Hammond: Organic Origins. @ Highgate Gallery
Mar 8 @ 11:00 am – 5:00 pm

    Image: Keith Hammond, Japanese Maple

ORGANIC ORIGINS.  Photographic Artworks by Keith Hammond

Artist and photographer Keith Hammond’s first solo exhibition at the Highgate Gallery in London takes a radical departure to nature photography.

Entitled Organic Origins, the exhibition showcases 14 of Hammond’s landscape works.  Mostly taken in north London’s open spaces, including Hampstead Heath and Waterlow Park close to the gallery, each has a different theme, from Japanese Maple (2014) to Water Iris Shoots (2015), Frost on Leaf and Grass (2015) and Arching Beech (2016).

In these large-scale works, Hammond’s intention is to explore the way we look at nature.  Rather than use a single shot composed in the picturesque tradition, he takes a radical approach, using a grid system that investigates each landscape from multiple viewpoints.  Hammond then incorporates these smaller images and details into each finished image, making works that are more than the sum of their parts, and which reward repeated viewing.

The artworks in Organic Origins also invite comparison with other artists such as Gilbert and George and David Hockney, whose workshops he has attended. Hammond’s use of “joiners” (the photographic term for smaller images that combine to compose a larger picture) itself questions the act of perception, inviting a re-evaluation of photographic truth and the single “decisive moment”. Instead, his artworks respond to the way the eye actually works in nature: sometimes near, sometimes far, always restless.

“We don’t look at a beautiful tree or a landscape for just a split second. We take our time, our eyes wander all over the scene, we take it all in; the leaves shake in the wind, the waters ripple, the clouds move, the light changes. Nothing is static.”  Keith Hammond, 2019

Hammond also works on his images post-production.  Several of the landscapes in Organic Origins have been digitally manipulated to bring out details that are unattainable within the normal colour spectrum.  The intention is to gain a wider harmony in the image – and express a wider truth about the relationship between the viewer and the natural world.

“I want to connect with something essential about the natural world; something that is palpably already there if we just take the time to look.” Keith Hammond, 2019.

“I have had a passion for trees since I was a small girl.  If you’re similarly attracted to their changing colours and shapes, please spend time at Keith Hammond’s exhibition at the Highgate Gallery.  He is a remarkable photographer.”  Dame Judi Dench, 2020.

The artworks are for sale. From a series of 50 images, the 14 limited-edition works in the exhibition range from 1-2.5m in size. Prices £1,000-£4,000.

About Keith Hammond

A photographer since the 1960s, Keith Hammond has had a long career as an artist and photographer.  In 1998-99 he was invited to judge the John Kobal Portrait Award (now Taylor Wessing) exhibited at the National Portrait Gallery, London.  2014 Art for Art Sake, Cork St Gallery, London.

www.keithhammond.co.uk

Exhibition continues until 19 March.

Highgate Gallery open Tuesday-Friday 1-5pm, Saturday 11am-4pm, Sunday 11am-5pm; closed Mondays

Mar
10
Tue
Keith Hammond: Organic Origins. @ Highgate Gallery
Mar 10 @ 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Keith Hammond, Japanese Maple

ORGANIC ORIGINS.  Photographic Artworks by Keith Hammond

 Artist and photographer Keith Hammond’s first solo exhibition at the Highgate Gallery in London takes a radical departure to nature photography.

Entitled Organic Origins, the exhibition showcases 14 of Hammond’s landscape works.  Mostly taken in north London’s open spaces, including Hampstead Heath and Waterlow Park close to the gallery, each has a different theme, from Japanese Maple (2014) to Water Iris Shoots (2015), Frost on Leaf and Grass (2015) and Arching Beech (2016).

In these large-scale works, Hammond’s intention is to explore the way we look at nature.  Rather than use a single shot composed in the picturesque tradition, he takes a radical approach, using a grid system that investigates each landscape from multiple viewpoints.  Hammond then incorporates these smaller images and details into each finished image, making works that are more than the sum of their parts, and which reward repeated viewing.

The artworks in Organic Origins also invite comparison with other artists such as Gilbert and George and David Hockney, whose workshops he has attended. Hammond’s use of “joiners” (the photographic term for smaller images that combine to compose a larger picture) itself questions the act of perception, inviting a re-evaluation of photographic truth and the single “decisive moment”. Instead, his artworks respond to the way the eye actually works in nature: sometimes near, sometimes far, always restless.

“We don’t look at a beautiful tree or a landscape for just a split second. We take our time, our eyes wander all over the scene, we take it all in; the leaves shake in the wind, the waters ripple, the clouds move, the light changes. Nothing is static.”  Keith Hammond, 2019

Hammond also works on his images post-production.  Several of the landscapes in Organic Origins have been digitally manipulated to bring out details that are unattainable within the normal colour spectrum.  The intention is to gain a wider harmony in the image – and express a wider truth about the relationship between the viewer and the natural world.

“I want to connect with something essential about the natural world; something that is palpably already there if we just take the time to look.” Keith Hammond, 2019.

“I have had a passion for trees since I was a small girl.  If you’re similarly attracted to their changing colours and shapes, please spend time at Keith Hammond’s exhibition at the Highgate Gallery.  He is a remarkable photographer.”  Dame Judi Dench, 2020.

 The artworks are for sale. From a series of 50 images, the 14 limited-edition works in the exhibition range from 1-2.5m in size. Prices £1,000-£4,000.

About Keith Hammond

A photographer since the 1960s, Keith Hammond has had a long career as an artist and photographer.  In 1998-99 he was invited to judge the John Kobal Portrait Award (now Taylor Wessing) exhibited at the National Portrait Gallery, London.  2014 Art for Art Sake, Cork St Gallery, London.

www.keithhammond.co.uk

Exhibition continues until 19 March.

Highgate Gallery open Tuesday-Friday 1-5pm, Saturday 11am-4pm, Sunday 11am-5pm; closed Mondays

Mar
11
Wed
Keith Hammond: Organic Origins. @ Highgate Gallery
Mar 11 @ 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Keith Hammond, Japanese Maple

ORGANIC ORIGINS.  Photographic Artworks by Keith Hammond

 Artist and photographer Keith Hammond’s first solo exhibition at the Highgate Gallery in London takes a radical departure to nature photography.

Entitled Organic Origins, the exhibition showcases 14 of Hammond’s landscape works.  Mostly taken in north London’s open spaces, including Hampstead Heath and Waterlow Park close to the gallery, each has a different theme, from Japanese Maple (2014) to Water Iris Shoots (2015), Frost on Leaf and Grass (2015) and Arching Beech (2016).

In these large-scale works, Hammond’s intention is to explore the way we look at nature.  Rather than use a single shot composed in the picturesque tradition, he takes a radical approach, using a grid system that investigates each landscape from multiple viewpoints.  Hammond then incorporates these smaller images and details into each finished image, making works that are more than the sum of their parts, and which reward repeated viewing.

The artworks in Organic Origins also invite comparison with other artists such as Gilbert and George and David Hockney, whose workshops he has attended. Hammond’s use of “joiners” (the photographic term for smaller images that combine to compose a larger picture) itself questions the act of perception, inviting a re-evaluation of photographic truth and the single “decisive moment”. Instead, his artworks respond to the way the eye actually works in nature: sometimes near, sometimes far, always restless.

“We don’t look at a beautiful tree or a landscape for just a split second. We take our time, our eyes wander all over the scene, we take it all in; the leaves shake in the wind, the waters ripple, the clouds move, the light changes. Nothing is static.”  Keith Hammond, 2019

Hammond also works on his images post-production.  Several of the landscapes in Organic Origins have been digitally manipulated to bring out details that are unattainable within the normal colour spectrum.  The intention is to gain a wider harmony in the image – and express a wider truth about the relationship between the viewer and the natural world.

“I want to connect with something essential about the natural world; something that is palpably already there if we just take the time to look.” Keith Hammond, 2019.

“I have had a passion for trees since I was a small girl.  If you’re similarly attracted to their changing colours and shapes, please spend time at Keith Hammond’s exhibition at the Highgate Gallery.  He is a remarkable photographer.”  Dame Judi Dench, 2020.

 The artworks are for sale. From a series of 50 images, the 14 limited-edition works in the exhibition range from 1-2.5m in size. Prices £1,000-£4,000.

About Keith Hammond

A photographer since the 1960s, Keith Hammond has had a long career as an artist and photographer.  In 1998-99 he was invited to judge the John Kobal Portrait Award (now Taylor Wessing) exhibited at the National Portrait Gallery, London.  2014 Art for Art Sake, Cork St Gallery, London.

www.keithhammond.co.uk

Exhibition continues until 19 March.

Highgate Gallery open Tuesday-Friday 1-5pm, Saturday 11am-4pm, Sunday 11am-5pm; closed Mondays

Mar
12
Thu
Keith Hammond: Organic Origins. @ Highgate Gallery
Mar 12 @ 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Keith Hammond, Japanese Maple

ORGANIC ORIGINS.  Photographic Artworks by Keith Hammond

 Artist and photographer Keith Hammond’s first solo exhibition at the Highgate Gallery in London takes a radical departure to nature photography.

Entitled Organic Origins, the exhibition showcases 14 of Hammond’s landscape works.  Mostly taken in north London’s open spaces, including Hampstead Heath and Waterlow Park close to the gallery, each has a different theme, from Japanese Maple (2014) to Water Iris Shoots (2015), Frost on Leaf and Grass (2015) and Arching Beech (2016).

In these large-scale works, Hammond’s intention is to explore the way we look at nature.  Rather than use a single shot composed in the picturesque tradition, he takes a radical approach, using a grid system that investigates each landscape from multiple viewpoints.  Hammond then incorporates these smaller images and details into each finished image, making works that are more than the sum of their parts, and which reward repeated viewing.

The artworks in Organic Origins also invite comparison with other artists such as Gilbert and George and David Hockney, whose workshops he has attended. Hammond’s use of “joiners” (the photographic term for smaller images that combine to compose a larger picture) itself questions the act of perception, inviting a re-evaluation of photographic truth and the single “decisive moment”. Instead, his artworks respond to the way the eye actually works in nature: sometimes near, sometimes far, always restless.

“We don’t look at a beautiful tree or a landscape for just a split second. We take our time, our eyes wander all over the scene, we take it all in; the leaves shake in the wind, the waters ripple, the clouds move, the light changes. Nothing is static.”  Keith Hammond, 2019

Hammond also works on his images post-production.  Several of the landscapes in Organic Origins have been digitally manipulated to bring out details that are unattainable within the normal colour spectrum.  The intention is to gain a wider harmony in the image – and express a wider truth about the relationship between the viewer and the natural world.

“I want to connect with something essential about the natural world; something that is palpably already there if we just take the time to look.” Keith Hammond, 2019.

“I have had a passion for trees since I was a small girl.  If you’re similarly attracted to their changing colours and shapes, please spend time at Keith Hammond’s exhibition at the Highgate Gallery.  He is a remarkable photographer.”  Dame Judi Dench, 2020.

 The artworks are for sale. From a series of 50 images, the 14 limited-edition works in the exhibition range from 1-2.5m in size. Prices £1,000-£4,000.

About Keith Hammond

A photographer since the 1960s, Keith Hammond has had a long career as an artist and photographer.  In 1998-99 he was invited to judge the John Kobal Portrait Award (now Taylor Wessing) exhibited at the National Portrait Gallery, London.  2014 Art for Art Sake, Cork St Gallery, London.

www.keithhammond.co.uk

Exhibition continues until 19 March.

Highgate Gallery open Tuesday-Friday 1-5pm, Saturday 11am-4pm, Sunday 11am-5pm; closed Mondays

Mar
13
Fri
Keith Hammond: Organic Origins. @ Highgate Gallery
Mar 13 @ 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Keith Hammond, Japanese Maple

ORGANIC ORIGINS.  Photographic Artworks by Keith Hammond

 Artist and photographer Keith Hammond’s first solo exhibition at the Highgate Gallery in London takes a radical departure to nature photography.

Entitled Organic Origins, the exhibition showcases 14 of Hammond’s landscape works.  Mostly taken in north London’s open spaces, including Hampstead Heath and Waterlow Park close to the gallery, each has a different theme, from Japanese Maple (2014) to Water Iris Shoots (2015), Frost on Leaf and Grass (2015) and Arching Beech (2016).

In these large-scale works, Hammond’s intention is to explore the way we look at nature.  Rather than use a single shot composed in the picturesque tradition, he takes a radical approach, using a grid system that investigates each landscape from multiple viewpoints.  Hammond then incorporates these smaller images and details into each finished image, making works that are more than the sum of their parts, and which reward repeated viewing.

The artworks in Organic Origins also invite comparison with other artists such as Gilbert and George and David Hockney, whose workshops he has attended. Hammond’s use of “joiners” (the photographic term for smaller images that combine to compose a larger picture) itself questions the act of perception, inviting a re-evaluation of photographic truth and the single “decisive moment”. Instead, his artworks respond to the way the eye actually works in nature: sometimes near, sometimes far, always restless.

“We don’t look at a beautiful tree or a landscape for just a split second. We take our time, our eyes wander all over the scene, we take it all in; the leaves shake in the wind, the waters ripple, the clouds move, the light changes. Nothing is static.”  Keith Hammond, 2019

Hammond also works on his images post-production.  Several of the landscapes in Organic Origins have been digitally manipulated to bring out details that are unattainable within the normal colour spectrum.  The intention is to gain a wider harmony in the image – and express a wider truth about the relationship between the viewer and the natural world.

“I want to connect with something essential about the natural world; something that is palpably already there if we just take the time to look.” Keith Hammond, 2019.

“I have had a passion for trees since I was a small girl.  If you’re similarly attracted to their changing colours and shapes, please spend time at Keith Hammond’s exhibition at the Highgate Gallery.  He is a remarkable photographer.”  Dame Judi Dench, 2020.

 The artworks are for sale. From a series of 50 images, the 14 limited-edition works in the exhibition range from 1-2.5m in size. Prices £1,000-£4,000.

About Keith Hammond

A photographer since the 1960s, Keith Hammond has had a long career as an artist and photographer.  In 1998-99 he was invited to judge the John Kobal Portrait Award (now Taylor Wessing) exhibited at the National Portrait Gallery, London.  2014 Art for Art Sake, Cork St Gallery, London.

www.keithhammond.co.uk

Exhibition continues until 19 March.

Highgate Gallery open Tuesday-Friday 1-5pm, Saturday 11am-4pm, Sunday 11am-5pm; closed Mondays

Mar
14
Sat
Keith Hammond: Organic Origins. @ Highgate Gallery
Mar 14 @ 11:00 am – 4:00 pm
Keith Hammond, Japanese Maple

ORGANIC ORIGINS.  Photographic Artworks by Keith Hammond

 Artist and photographer Keith Hammond’s first solo exhibition at the Highgate Gallery in London takes a radical departure to nature photography.

Entitled Organic Origins, the exhibition showcases 14 of Hammond’s landscape works.  Mostly taken in north London’s open spaces, including Hampstead Heath and Waterlow Park close to the gallery, each has a different theme, from Japanese Maple (2014) to Water Iris Shoots (2015), Frost on Leaf and Grass (2015) and Arching Beech (2016).

In these large-scale works, Hammond’s intention is to explore the way we look at nature.  Rather than use a single shot composed in the picturesque tradition, he takes a radical approach, using a grid system that investigates each landscape from multiple viewpoints.  Hammond then incorporates these smaller images and details into each finished image, making works that are more than the sum of their parts, and which reward repeated viewing.

The artworks in Organic Origins also invite comparison with other artists such as Gilbert and George and David Hockney, whose workshops he has attended. Hammond’s use of “joiners” (the photographic term for smaller images that combine to compose a larger picture) itself questions the act of perception, inviting a re-evaluation of photographic truth and the single “decisive moment”. Instead, his artworks respond to the way the eye actually works in nature: sometimes near, sometimes far, always restless.

“We don’t look at a beautiful tree or a landscape for just a split second. We take our time, our eyes wander all over the scene, we take it all in; the leaves shake in the wind, the waters ripple, the clouds move, the light changes. Nothing is static.”  Keith Hammond, 2019

Hammond also works on his images post-production.  Several of the landscapes in Organic Origins have been digitally manipulated to bring out details that are unattainable within the normal colour spectrum.  The intention is to gain a wider harmony in the image – and express a wider truth about the relationship between the viewer and the natural world.

“I want to connect with something essential about the natural world; something that is palpably already there if we just take the time to look.” Keith Hammond, 2019.

“I have had a passion for trees since I was a small girl.  If you’re similarly attracted to their changing colours and shapes, please spend time at Keith Hammond’s exhibition at the Highgate Gallery.  He is a remarkable photographer.”  Dame Judi Dench, 2020.

 The artworks are for sale. From a series of 50 images, the 14 limited-edition works in the exhibition range from 1-2.5m in size. Prices £1,000-£4,000.

About Keith Hammond

A photographer since the 1960s, Keith Hammond has had a long career as an artist and photographer.  In 1998-99 he was invited to judge the John Kobal Portrait Award (now Taylor Wessing) exhibited at the National Portrait Gallery, London.  2014 Art for Art Sake, Cork St Gallery, London.

www.keithhammond.co.uk

Exhibition continues until 19 March.

Highgate Gallery open Tuesday-Friday 1-5pm, Saturday 11am-4pm, Sunday 11am-5pm; closed Mondays

Mar
15
Sun
Keith Hammond: Organic Origins. @ Highgate Gallery
Mar 15 @ 11:00 am – 5:00 pm

    Image: Keith Hammond, Japanese Maple

ORGANIC ORIGINS.  Photographic Artworks by Keith Hammond

Artist and photographer Keith Hammond’s first solo exhibition at the Highgate Gallery in London takes a radical departure to nature photography.

Entitled Organic Origins, the exhibition showcases 14 of Hammond’s landscape works.  Mostly taken in north London’s open spaces, including Hampstead Heath and Waterlow Park close to the gallery, each has a different theme, from Japanese Maple (2014) to Water Iris Shoots (2015), Frost on Leaf and Grass (2015) and Arching Beech (2016).

In these large-scale works, Hammond’s intention is to explore the way we look at nature.  Rather than use a single shot composed in the picturesque tradition, he takes a radical approach, using a grid system that investigates each landscape from multiple viewpoints.  Hammond then incorporates these smaller images and details into each finished image, making works that are more than the sum of their parts, and which reward repeated viewing.

The artworks in Organic Origins also invite comparison with other artists such as Gilbert and George and David Hockney, whose workshops he has attended. Hammond’s use of “joiners” (the photographic term for smaller images that combine to compose a larger picture) itself questions the act of perception, inviting a re-evaluation of photographic truth and the single “decisive moment”. Instead, his artworks respond to the way the eye actually works in nature: sometimes near, sometimes far, always restless.

“We don’t look at a beautiful tree or a landscape for just a split second. We take our time, our eyes wander all over the scene, we take it all in; the leaves shake in the wind, the waters ripple, the clouds move, the light changes. Nothing is static.”  Keith Hammond, 2019

Hammond also works on his images post-production.  Several of the landscapes in Organic Origins have been digitally manipulated to bring out details that are unattainable within the normal colour spectrum.  The intention is to gain a wider harmony in the image – and express a wider truth about the relationship between the viewer and the natural world.

“I want to connect with something essential about the natural world; something that is palpably already there if we just take the time to look.” Keith Hammond, 2019.

“I have had a passion for trees since I was a small girl.  If you’re similarly attracted to their changing colours and shapes, please spend time at Keith Hammond’s exhibition at the Highgate Gallery.  He is a remarkable photographer.”  Dame Judi Dench, 2020.

The artworks are for sale. From a series of 50 images, the 14 limited-edition works in the exhibition range from 1-2.5m in size. Prices £1,000-£4,000.

About Keith Hammond

A photographer since the 1960s, Keith Hammond has had a long career as an artist and photographer.  In 1998-99 he was invited to judge the John Kobal Portrait Award (now Taylor Wessing) exhibited at the National Portrait Gallery, London.  2014 Art for Art Sake, Cork St Gallery, London.

www.keithhammond.co.uk

Exhibition continues until 19 March.

Highgate Gallery open Tuesday-Friday 1-5pm, Saturday 11am-4pm, Sunday 11am-5pm; closed Mondays

Mar
17
Tue
Keith Hammond: Organic Origins. @ Highgate Gallery
Mar 17 @ 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Keith Hammond, Japanese Maple

ORGANIC ORIGINS.  Photographic Artworks by Keith Hammond

 Artist and photographer Keith Hammond’s first solo exhibition at the Highgate Gallery in London takes a radical departure to nature photography.

Entitled Organic Origins, the exhibition showcases 14 of Hammond’s landscape works.  Mostly taken in north London’s open spaces, including Hampstead Heath and Waterlow Park close to the gallery, each has a different theme, from Japanese Maple (2014) to Water Iris Shoots (2015), Frost on Leaf and Grass (2015) and Arching Beech (2016).

In these large-scale works, Hammond’s intention is to explore the way we look at nature.  Rather than use a single shot composed in the picturesque tradition, he takes a radical approach, using a grid system that investigates each landscape from multiple viewpoints.  Hammond then incorporates these smaller images and details into each finished image, making works that are more than the sum of their parts, and which reward repeated viewing.

The artworks in Organic Origins also invite comparison with other artists such as Gilbert and George and David Hockney, whose workshops he has attended. Hammond’s use of “joiners” (the photographic term for smaller images that combine to compose a larger picture) itself questions the act of perception, inviting a re-evaluation of photographic truth and the single “decisive moment”. Instead, his artworks respond to the way the eye actually works in nature: sometimes near, sometimes far, always restless.

“We don’t look at a beautiful tree or a landscape for just a split second. We take our time, our eyes wander all over the scene, we take it all in; the leaves shake in the wind, the waters ripple, the clouds move, the light changes. Nothing is static.”  Keith Hammond, 2019

Hammond also works on his images post-production.  Several of the landscapes in Organic Origins have been digitally manipulated to bring out details that are unattainable within the normal colour spectrum.  The intention is to gain a wider harmony in the image – and express a wider truth about the relationship between the viewer and the natural world.

“I want to connect with something essential about the natural world; something that is palpably already there if we just take the time to look.” Keith Hammond, 2019.

“I have had a passion for trees since I was a small girl.  If you’re similarly attracted to their changing colours and shapes, please spend time at Keith Hammond’s exhibition at the Highgate Gallery.  He is a remarkable photographer.”  Dame Judi Dench, 2020.

 The artworks are for sale. From a series of 50 images, the 14 limited-edition works in the exhibition range from 1-2.5m in size. Prices £1,000-£4,000.

About Keith Hammond

A photographer since the 1960s, Keith Hammond has had a long career as an artist and photographer.  In 1998-99 he was invited to judge the John Kobal Portrait Award (now Taylor Wessing) exhibited at the National Portrait Gallery, London.  2014 Art for Art Sake, Cork St Gallery, London.

www.keithhammond.co.uk

Exhibition continues until 19 March.

Highgate Gallery open Tuesday-Friday 1-5pm, Saturday 11am-4pm, Sunday 11am-5pm; closed Mondays

Mar
18
Wed
Keith Hammond: Organic Origins. @ Highgate Gallery
Mar 18 @ 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Keith Hammond, Japanese Maple

ORGANIC ORIGINS.  Photographic Artworks by Keith Hammond

 Artist and photographer Keith Hammond’s first solo exhibition at the Highgate Gallery in London takes a radical departure to nature photography.

Entitled Organic Origins, the exhibition showcases 14 of Hammond’s landscape works.  Mostly taken in north London’s open spaces, including Hampstead Heath and Waterlow Park close to the gallery, each has a different theme, from Japanese Maple (2014) to Water Iris Shoots (2015), Frost on Leaf and Grass (2015) and Arching Beech (2016).

In these large-scale works, Hammond’s intention is to explore the way we look at nature.  Rather than use a single shot composed in the picturesque tradition, he takes a radical approach, using a grid system that investigates each landscape from multiple viewpoints.  Hammond then incorporates these smaller images and details into each finished image, making works that are more than the sum of their parts, and which reward repeated viewing.

The artworks in Organic Origins also invite comparison with other artists such as Gilbert and George and David Hockney, whose workshops he has attended. Hammond’s use of “joiners” (the photographic term for smaller images that combine to compose a larger picture) itself questions the act of perception, inviting a re-evaluation of photographic truth and the single “decisive moment”. Instead, his artworks respond to the way the eye actually works in nature: sometimes near, sometimes far, always restless.

“We don’t look at a beautiful tree or a landscape for just a split second. We take our time, our eyes wander all over the scene, we take it all in; the leaves shake in the wind, the waters ripple, the clouds move, the light changes. Nothing is static.”  Keith Hammond, 2019

Hammond also works on his images post-production.  Several of the landscapes in Organic Origins have been digitally manipulated to bring out details that are unattainable within the normal colour spectrum.  The intention is to gain a wider harmony in the image – and express a wider truth about the relationship between the viewer and the natural world.

“I want to connect with something essential about the natural world; something that is palpably already there if we just take the time to look.” Keith Hammond, 2019.

“I have had a passion for trees since I was a small girl.  If you’re similarly attracted to their changing colours and shapes, please spend time at Keith Hammond’s exhibition at the Highgate Gallery.  He is a remarkable photographer.”  Dame Judi Dench, 2020.

 The artworks are for sale. From a series of 50 images, the 14 limited-edition works in the exhibition range from 1-2.5m in size. Prices £1,000-£4,000.

About Keith Hammond

A photographer since the 1960s, Keith Hammond has had a long career as an artist and photographer.  In 1998-99 he was invited to judge the John Kobal Portrait Award (now Taylor Wessing) exhibited at the National Portrait Gallery, London.  2014 Art for Art Sake, Cork St Gallery, London.

www.keithhammond.co.uk

Exhibition continues until 19 March.

Highgate Gallery open Tuesday-Friday 1-5pm, Saturday 11am-4pm, Sunday 11am-5pm; closed Mondays

Mar
19
Thu
Keith Hammond: Organic Origins. @ Highgate Gallery
Mar 19 @ 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Keith Hammond, Japanese Maple

ORGANIC ORIGINS.  Photographic Artworks by Keith Hammond

 Artist and photographer Keith Hammond’s first solo exhibition at the Highgate Gallery in London takes a radical departure to nature photography.

Entitled Organic Origins, the exhibition showcases 14 of Hammond’s landscape works.  Mostly taken in north London’s open spaces, including Hampstead Heath and Waterlow Park close to the gallery, each has a different theme, from Japanese Maple (2014) to Water Iris Shoots (2015), Frost on Leaf and Grass (2015) and Arching Beech (2016).

In these large-scale works, Hammond’s intention is to explore the way we look at nature.  Rather than use a single shot composed in the picturesque tradition, he takes a radical approach, using a grid system that investigates each landscape from multiple viewpoints.  Hammond then incorporates these smaller images and details into each finished image, making works that are more than the sum of their parts, and which reward repeated viewing.

The artworks in Organic Origins also invite comparison with other artists such as Gilbert and George and David Hockney, whose workshops he has attended. Hammond’s use of “joiners” (the photographic term for smaller images that combine to compose a larger picture) itself questions the act of perception, inviting a re-evaluation of photographic truth and the single “decisive moment”. Instead, his artworks respond to the way the eye actually works in nature: sometimes near, sometimes far, always restless.

“We don’t look at a beautiful tree or a landscape for just a split second. We take our time, our eyes wander all over the scene, we take it all in; the leaves shake in the wind, the waters ripple, the clouds move, the light changes. Nothing is static.”  Keith Hammond, 2019

Hammond also works on his images post-production.  Several of the landscapes in Organic Origins have been digitally manipulated to bring out details that are unattainable within the normal colour spectrum.  The intention is to gain a wider harmony in the image – and express a wider truth about the relationship between the viewer and the natural world.

“I want to connect with something essential about the natural world; something that is palpably already there if we just take the time to look.” Keith Hammond, 2019.

“I have had a passion for trees since I was a small girl.  If you’re similarly attracted to their changing colours and shapes, please spend time at Keith Hammond’s exhibition at the Highgate Gallery.  He is a remarkable photographer.”  Dame Judi Dench, 2020.

 The artworks are for sale. From a series of 50 images, the 14 limited-edition works in the exhibition range from 1-2.5m in size. Prices £1,000-£4,000.

About Keith Hammond

A photographer since the 1960s, Keith Hammond has had a long career as an artist and photographer.  In 1998-99 he was invited to judge the John Kobal Portrait Award (now Taylor Wessing) exhibited at the National Portrait Gallery, London.  2014 Art for Art Sake, Cork St Gallery, London.

www.keithhammond.co.uk

Exhibition continues until 19 March.

Highgate Gallery open Tuesday-Friday 1-5pm, Saturday 11am-4pm, Sunday 11am-5pm; closed Mondays